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Think Strategically About Your Brand’s Visual Identity

At some point in your brand’s history you’ll have to determine what sort of visual identity to employ. Should it be all sweetness and light, with pastel colors, heart shapes and curlicues? Or should it display large, aggressive color blocks of red, black and white, with big, bold typography that demands attention? Should your brand be a peacock or an eagle, or some other bird altogether? It’s a serious discussion because decision makers will use these visual cues to determine whether or not to let your brand into their lives. You have to remember what purpose your customers or clients have for you. Your product or service is a tool that they use to achieve something. What is it? Whatever their purpose is for you, you have to look like you can fulfill that purpose.

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Topics: Identity

New Vistas in Municipal Brand Identity

The City of Santa Clarita was first incorporated back in 1987 when I was a freelance graphic designer. Almost immediately the new City Council announced they would commission the design of a new logo to represent the city. As a resident, I was excited. I knew my portfolio was good, plus I had done volunteer work for the campaign to incorporate. I thought I had a good chance of landing the job so I eagerly attended the City Council meeting where the new logo would be discussed. That evening I looked around the room, wondering who was there to compete for the logo and who was there for other city business. Finally, the agenda item came up. A councilwoman, much respected for her tireless efforts to achieve incorporation, began speaking about what the new logo would have to express. There would have to be a house to represent our residential community. There would have to be a factory to represent business. There would have to be an orange tree to represent agriculture. There would have to be an oak tree to represent strength and heritage. On and on she droned, listing item after item that were must-haves, all to appear in a space that, most often, would appear no bigger than your thumb. My heart sank as I realized they didn’t really want a logo. They wanted a city seal.

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Topics: Identity

New Dimensions To Brand Identity

Logo. Logotype. Mark. Wordmark. Corporate identity. Visual identity. Brand identity. Trade dress. What exactly are we talking about here? The jargon can be confusing to the uninitiated. Even graphic designers will disagree about what some of these terms mean. So let’s start at the beginning. The activity of branding is the creation of a love affair between a market and something that needs to be marketed. Whatever the marketable asset is – business, product, service, event, campaign, project – it needs a sound brand strategy from which to launch its marketing campaigns. Otherwise, those campaigns will not succeed. When the marketing message goes out, the market needs to recognize who is sending that message. They need to know, like and trust that messenger. They need to feel they share values with that entity and that it belongs in their life. They need to have genuine feelings for it. And, since human beings get 90% of their information visually – before reading a single word – the marketable asset needs to communicate who it is and what it’s about graphically. It needs to harness colors and images and shapes to establish an enduring “place” in the market’s mind. At least, that’s the way it used to work.

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Topics: Identity

Interactive Brand Identities

Comic-Con 2018 ended last week. It’s an annual, orgiastic celebration of a certain sliver of pop culture, the kind that originates from comic books or other forms of serial storytelling. Fans reveal their truly scary fanaticism by engaging in cosplay, crafting elaborate costumes for themselves so as to “become” their favorite fictitious character. Then they scurry about, eagerly searching for collectibles or attending panel discussions or getting selfies with movie stars. It’s easy to dismiss these people as nerds with too much time on their hands. But one thing you have to give them – they’re creative. When fans of a popular franchise – say Star Wars or Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings – get tired of waiting for the next installment, they sometimes take matters into their own hands. They write stories of their own and publish them online. They draw their own comic books. They even film their own adventures of characters they’d like to see more of, like Boba Fett or Tom Bombadil. Of course, these franchises have their corporate overlords who employ squadrons of attorneys to squash anyone who dares violate copyright laws. But it’s a weird dynamic when you’re sending your brand police after your own best customers. And here’s the thing: As more and more non-entertainment brands attain cult-like status, they’ll start running into the same issues. How to prepare?

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Topics: Identity

Outlaw Brands From Space

I’d like to tell you about two people I know, Pat Hawk and Ray Coen. Pat Hawk is the COO of Tony Hawk, Inc., and also the famous skateboarder’s sister. Ray Coen is the principal at Ray Coen & Associates, a leading consultancy advising restaurant chains in the US. I met each of them in different circumstances and, as far as I know, the two have never met. But they’re both super smart, successful and absolutely worth listening to. I’ve had the opportunity to talk to each of them about branding and I learned from both conversations. They each had completely opposing approaches to brand-building. At the time of each conversation, I was perplexed. The things they were telling me didn’t compute. Then, after some time had passed, both arguments started to make sense but I couldn’t get over how they seemed to contradict each other. Now I see how these two brilliant marketing minds are both, absolutely, 100% correct.

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Topics: Identity

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Best Branding Reads
Week of December 10, 2018

Why Brands Are Crucial To Innovation
A fascinating and compelling reversal of the adage: Innovation is crucial to brands

Brands once used elitism to market themselves. Now inclusion sells.
Exclusion still works for very high-end luxury experiences.

No more Mr. Nice Guy: why every brand needs an enemy
V-e-r-r-r-y interesting, Mr. Bond.

How B2B Brands Succeed With Thought Leadership
“But only when … others can benefit…”. That’s the key.

Queen logo: Who designed it and what does it mean?
Never knew they even had a logo. Guess I’m just a casual fan.

New Logo for Drinkworks
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How this veteran’s company found profits in Trump-era patriotism and polarization
“Polarizing topics create brands.” says the entrepreneur.  How I wish this wasn’t true.

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